«

»

Rope Bondage Part 3: Rope Basics

In the third part of our rope bondage tutorial we cover the basics: rope types, storage and care

Rope Material Selection

There are a great variety of rope materials on the market, both natural & synthetic. The image to the left shows white cotton rope at the top, a flat-weave nylon in the middle and some 6mm hemp at the bottom.

Synthetic ropes have the advantage of being cheap and relatively easy to get hold of and some even come with a “flat wave” that causes the rope to lie flatter against the skin. Materials include polyester, multi-filament polypropylene (MFP) and nylon. The biggest disadvantage with synthetic materials is the burn speed: it requires very little speed of rope against skin to potentially cause rope burn.

There are as many natural rope materials as there are synthetic: hemp, jute and cotton are the most common. All have various pros & cons.

Material Cost Stretch Burn Speed Comfort Knot Holding Notes
Hemp High Low Medium-High Medium Good Amazing “grassy” smell
Jute Medium-High Low Medium-High Medium Good
Sisal Low Low Medium Poor Good Very splintery, not recommended
Cotton Low High High Good Medium
Nylon Low Medium Low Poor Good Waterproof!
MFP Medium Medium Medium Good Poor Waterproof, easy clean. Do not use monofilament polypropylene

Don’t be limited by “traditional” materials and use whatever takes your fancy; bungee cord, webbing straps and even medical rubber tubing can all be used. Just be sure to check the burn speed of a new material by pulling it quickly through your hands first. On balance though, I personally prefer hemp & jute.

Rope Anatomy

You will often see references to the “ends” & “bight” of a rope: Japanese-style bondage is mostly done with a doubled up length of rope so your tying is done twice as fast! A loop formed at the middle (or anywhere else) of a piece of rope is called a bight. The dangly bits that have been whipped or knotted are the ends.

Rope Care

Be sure to look after your rope, keeping it clean & dry between sessions. Whilst this is common sense to a certain extent this is especially important for ropes made from natural materials. Hemp & jute will deteriorate rapidly if left damp and will benefit from an occasional oiling with jojoba, tea seed, hemp, mineral or mink oil.

Wash your rope in the machine inside an old pillow case if necessary and if the rope has been exposed to any nasty pathogens just throw it away and buy new.

Between sessions neatly bundle your rope with either a coil or a rope chain:

1) Start with the ends of your rope:

2) Create a loop of rope with the ends under the loop:

3) Put your fingers through the loop and grab hold of the rope:

4) Pull though to form a new loop and repeat the process:

5) Stop when you have about 6 inches of rope before the bight:

6) Take the bight and pass it through the last loop to stop the chain from unravelling:

To use the rope simply thread the bight back through the loop, undoing what you did in step 6, then hold the ends of the chain and pull on the bight: the chain will unravel leaving you with the bight ready to play.

4 comments

1 ping

Skip to comment form

  1. Matthew

    Storing natural fibre rope as a chain is detrimental, it should be stored as flat as possible. A lady who makes her own rope told me this.

  2. loki

    @Matthew – interesting! I’ve not had problems storing mine like this (or in coils) but I suppose you could end up with kinks in the rope if they’re stored like that for an extended period. How do you look after yours?

  3. Matthew

    It’s hard to put it in words, but I fold it between thumbs, cat’s cradle style then when I have a few folds left I wrap it around the neck once, then again, trapping a thumb, then pull a loop through where I removed my thumb from and tighten. One pull on the bight and it unravels easily for use

    1. loki

      Yes, I know exactly what you mean :) To be honest that’s my favourite method but lots of people have asked me about doing a rope chain so thought I’d document that one instead. I guess I know what my next post will be about now!

  1. Tweets that mention Rope Bondage Part 3: Rope Basics | Warped Rope - Hemp Bondage Rope -- Topsy.com

    […] This post was mentioned on Twitter by Loki, Warped rope. Warped rope said: Part 3 of my rope bondage tutorial covering material selection, storage how to do a rope chain http://ow.ly/3gr4p […]

Comments have been disabled.